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[untitled]

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Channel 89 (615 MHz)

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mpeg2video

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ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
528

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480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 5, San Francisco 5, Seattle 2, Unpermitted 1, An International City 1, United States 1, Dpw 1, Bluegrass 1, Rwanda 1, Abel 1, Mohammed 1, Stockton 1, Steve Mathias 1, Cavalini 1, Joseph 1, Deborah 1, Cabarrus 1, Lauren 1, The Blue Angels 1, Chinatown 1,
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  SFGTV    [untitled]  

    October 6, 2012
    10:30 - 11:00pm PDT  

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she will be a new commissioner. >> hello. >> she is taking the public health seat. and this was a really good education today. she was approved by the full board and i don't know when the swearing-in will be, but if we could manage to get here in by the next meeting she will be one of you and you will help her along as she gets to the all the materials she has to read. they will be finishing up commissioner cavalini's term. so at the end of this fiscal year, she will have to be re-appointed or not, depending on the case. so help her along and say hello and i don't know if she would like to come up and say a few words? >> welcome. >> it's been great to be here and i really appreciate all of the support i have gotten from folks.
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and i'm looking forward to working with the commission. i also have to use the restroom, [ laughter ] [ laughter ] so i will be brief. >> actually you have seen a long-running meeting, which isn't usual. >> police, do you have anything? >> oh, my gosh, he is still here. >> he is here at time and a half. [ laughter ] >> good evening commissioner staff, steve mathias from mission statement. i will run down the incidents running in the central district. august 26th at 1:30 a victim said she was choked by a
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bouncer at club atmosphere. the victim said that -- he was handcuffed and escorted out by security and then released. so we're still looking into that. an illegal unpermitted party occurred september 9th at 3:45 a.m. police responded on report of an assault and reports of a gun. fire was called out. 200-250 people when they finally opened the door came out. i have gone to the manager who owns the building and we talked about that as far as the permit process and they said that would not happen again. september 22nd a victim had her purse stolen, total loss was about $600. september 23rd at club atmosphere, a fight broke out between patrons. there were at least three separate fights going on at this time. the fights spilled out into the
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alley and police were forced to deploy pepper-spray on the combatants. two brothers were arrested for being drunk in public. there was a battery at monroe. two patrons two, ladies said they were assaulted by the bar tender. and this is one of the situation where's it's very, very helpful to have video. because there are witnesss that said the bartender did this and that. the video showed the opposite. that the bartender was rushed. so as far as getting that in the establishments. so if something does happen, if people are drinking, you don't always see things or there is a
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lot of emotion, but the video gives a clear example of what is going on. let's see, last thing was just there has been a multitude of fights last weekend on broadway and columbus that could not be tied to an individual club. >> thank you. >> i just want to tell you, october 13th, marin county fairgrounds, dog show. >> very nice. >> see you there. >> okay. so item no. 7, commissioners comments and questions? >> i just wanted to say that the folsom street fair was really great again this year. this will be my last year hosting the rock 'n' roll stage. it's time for me to go out and have fun rather than dress up and perform like a trained dog. but it was really fin. hope you can make the castro street fair as well. >> i would like to thank everybody responsible for putting our party together.
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it was a nice event and first time i have been in a club for a while. and the one problem that i had and i think this may lead to serious issues when everybody from the staff was asked to make a funny face in the picture, there is one person on our staff that didn't do anything. [ laughter ] >> that is an issue. i agree. that is totally an issue. >> commissioner joseph told me my face was funny already. [ laughter ] >> all right. anything else? i just want to say -- >> my turn. >> it's all yours. >> sam wo the famous chinese restaurant we have the plans.
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we had our first community fundraiser for that. and they are going to get that started. and we're going to hopefully get that thing up and running again. they are going to do their late-night food. >> speaking of that, the woman that cuts my hair, no jokes. [ laughter ] she is chinese and she told me that one of the most -- if not the most expensive chinese restaurant in the united states is going in on stockton. have you heard about that? i couldn't understand if she said 15 or $50 million is going into it and the entreewill be $200. >> are you sure it's not a gentleman's club? >> some very wealthy person
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coming out of london to open this restaurant somewhere down in chinatown. >> not the guy on market street? >> no. >> so also my comments, this is a very busy weekend in san francisco. and so is next weekend. and this month we host fleet week, the blue angels, america's cup. >> decompression. >> strictly bluegrass. ghost ship op treasure island. lots of really good things. lots of people coming into town. >> 2nd sundays. >> and again, more late-night food. >> all right. >> well, that will conclude the october 2, 2012 meeting. entertainment commission for
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the cabarrus of city and county of san francisco. >> 7 and a half million renovation is part of the clean and safe neighbor's park fund
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which was on the ballot four years ago and look at how that public investment has transformed our neighborhood. >> the playground is unique in that it serves a number of age groups, unlike many of the other properties, it serves small children with the children's play grounds and clubhouses that has basketball courts, it has an outdoor soccer field and so there were a lot of people that came to the table that had their wish list and we did our best to make sure that we kind of divided up spaces and made sure that we kept the old features of the playground but we were able to enhance all of those features.
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>> the playground and the soccer field and the tennis fields and it is such a key part of this neighborhood. >> we want kids to be here. we want families to be here and we want people to have athletic opportunities. >> we are given a real responsibility to insure that the public's money is used appropriately and that something really special comes of these projects. we generally have about an opportunity every 50 years to redo these spaces. and it is really, really rewarding to see children and families benefit, you know, from the change of culture, at each one of these properties >> and as a result of, what you see behind us, more kids are playing on our soccer fields than ever before. we have more girls playing sports than we have ever had before. [ applause ] fp >> and we are sending a strong message that san francisco families are welcome and we want you to stay.
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>> this park is open. ♪ >> a great man, is that what
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you called me? she has to be reminded. -- would you tell that to anita? i congratulate you and thank you for coming to san francisco. hopefully you also become a disaster --- we would be glad te to open up our minds and communities to receive ideas from across the country, if not the world as to how we can improve it. it never is about what just san francisco is doing. a lot of our ideas are
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homegrown. the ideas are transplanted and that is the greatness of our city. we're an international city. we want to show what ideas are coming out of the far east, china, malaysia, the philippines, singapore as well as all over from europe. perhaps from africa and south america. we can learn from that just as we have done with concepts like sunday streets where people take back the streets and start having fun in our urban communities and bringing out the children to enjoy the environment. this is our future generations so we have to have the best ideas. how to keep our environment and our strong. i want to tell you that there are a tremendous amount of enthusiasm for keeping our city grain trade we have at least three different projects that we have been focused on for a
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number of years. i have had the privilege with working with mohammed and our city engineers to accomplish this. most importantly with our community leaders and volunteers throughout every part of our neighborhoods. i hope that you do you is your time and take advantage of our wonderful weather to go out and do as many doors as possible of all the -- tours as possible of all the community gardens. we have a committee challenge program, one that i am proud to have headed up when we were at public works but also the city administrator. this program today funds almost $900,000 this year in programs that are all committee pushed. it is attacks checkoff for corporations and individuals.
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the fund this through the tax system to provide almost $1 million every year and is put into a community-driven process where community leaders will apply on behalf of themselves or their own streets or gardens and they can get grants of up to $100,000 or as small as $5,000. they could be groups that have never done anything except to start talking to each other about how to increase their neighborhoods's interest in reading and the environment. we have associated ourselves with the parks alliance and the clean city coalition to provide administrative support to any group that forms. as well as those groups that have school -- school themselves and gotten well organized and know what they're doing in their communities and want to increase their gardens.
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there will be gardens and a small ones, a few hundred square feet to those that are thousands of square feet large. i am taking over -- and taking over alleyways and the median strips, taking over long- abandoned areas and blighted areas. community groups and volunteers will form those alliances most of the time in concert with either dpw or our public utilities commission or our parks, recreation and parks department and we're open to those kinds of collaborations'. the committee challenge grant is an excellent model. without anybody's knowledge, i still call the director and say what is going on. dpw tried to keep out of their business.
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now our city [inaudible] i am reaching in to find out, what are those great things the neighbor rwanda to do and i would like to go out there and visit them. i signed off last year in 2011 the urban agriculture " ordinance. the ordinance for us was another reflection of city policy with the board of supervisors that we wanted to increase the opportunities for folks to grow crops. to grow agriculture, to be able to sell it if they so wish to to so we could have folks that already have that experience, but not necessarily at the corporate level. our urban agriculture is important to us. we have identified a number of abandoned lots all over the city and we would love to again excite volunteers and people who are interested in urban
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agriculture and the ability to distribute fresh produce to people who are in need. allow that to happen, working with our school district to see what can happen on their lots so the urban agriculture ordinance is something that you might want to take a look at. and finally, with our recreation and park department, the community gardens program, another broad program we have. taking lots, whether they are a few hundred square feet or thousands of square feet and activating them and hosting volunteers to be able to build community gardens. we now have 35 and growing established community gardens in the city. and again, all run by volunteers. some of them that our individual lots and individuals will grow in them and there are lots that are shared responsibilities and shared neighborhood responsibilities to
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grow crops and to grow agriculture there for not only eating purposes or flowers or any of the things that individuals wish to have. and they are happening in our golden gate park as well as in our neighborhood parks. we're excited that you hopefully, you can see those as well. those are three small examples of hopefully things that you can visit while you are here. i understand you are going through my home time, seattle next year -- my home town. seattle next. i was born and raised there. and of course, if that is not enough for you to do while you are here, you should talk to mohammed about getting tickets to the giants, the 49ers, or outside because that is -- outside plans because that is happening this weekend. that is the fun we have in our
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great city. we are a large city. i get to talk and write about the things we're doing, and i want you to know that the internment -- and permit, our commitment to greening are parts of what we're here to do because of the advocacy that you do across the country, keep of that work, keep reminding mayors like me and everybody else we have an obligation to take the greening ideas and put them into the urban setting. give our kids the chance to get dirty with their hands, but watch things grow as they grow. this is the only way i know how to run the city. i have worked in this alleyways for many years. worked in the dirtiest smelling streets of our city. i come out loving our people even greater.
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whenever graffiti we have is our challenge. whenever illegal dumping that goes on. it is the ability to excite and organize our communities around these issues that bring out the best of all of us. the investment in our neighborhoods is one of my number one priorities as the mayor of the city. and to have example after example of how we can unite more of our neighborhoods to make that investment, too. not just with money but with their skill sets. with their spirit. -- spirit of volunteerism. every other thing we can do to build strong communities. i know the guard association has as its core our own collaboration and education of folks to build that spirit out. and that spirit, the
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collaboration, that volunteerism will push us in government to do the right policies and open up more government were to the ideas that our neighborhoods have about building strong cities. thank you for being here. i want to thank all the sponsors from the hilton who is hosting as here to all the organizations, to our partners in ecology, the think tanks that help keep us going and give us better ideas around the country as how we can do it. today, we are 70% recycling, -- 78% recycling, the highest in the nation. i hope we will get 2 1/2% with your help. thank you very much. [applause] stupak
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>> welcome to "culturewire." today we are at recology. they are celebrate 20 years of one of the most incredibly unique artist residency programs. we are here to learn more from one of the resident artists. welcome to the show, deborah. tell us how this program began 20 years ago. >> the program began 20 years ago. our founder was an environmentalist and an activist and an artist in the 1970's. she started these street sweeping campaigns in the city. she started with kids. they had an exhibition at city hall. city officials heard about her
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efforts and they invited her to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when to come here?
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>> mainly, access to the materials. we also give them a lot of support. when they start, it is an empty studio. they go out to the public area and -- we call it the big store. they go out shopping, take the materials that, and get to work. it is kind of like a reprieve, so they can really focus on their body of work. >> when you are talking about recology, do you have the only sculpture garden at the top? >> it is based on work that was done many years ago in new york. it is the only kind of structured, artist program. weit is beautiful. a lot of the plants you see were pulled out of the garbage, and we use our compost to transplant them. the pathway is lined with rubble
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from the earthquake from the freeways we tour about 5000 people a year to our facility, adults and children. we talk about recycling and conservation. they can meet the artists. >> fantastic. let's go meet some of your current artists. here we are with lauren. can you tell us how long have been here so far and what you're working on? >> we started our residency on june 1, so we came into the studio then and spent most of the first couple weeks just digging around in the trash. i am continuing my body of work, kind of making these hand- embroidered objects from our day-to-day life. >> can you describe some of the things you have been making here? this is amazing. >> i think i started a lot of my work about the qualities of light is in the weight.
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i have been thinking a lot about things floating through the air. it is also very windy down here. there is a piece of sheet music up there that i have embroidered third. there is a pamphlet about hearing dea -- nearing death. this is a dead rabbit. this is what i am working on now. this is a greeting card that i found, making it embroidered. it is for a very special friend. >> while we were looking at this, i glanced down and this is amazing, and it is on top of a book, it is ridiculous and amazing. >> i am interested in the serendipity of these still life compositions. when he got to the garbage and to see the arrangement of objects that is completely spontaneous. it is probably one of the least thought of compositions. people are getting rid of this
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stuff. it holds no real value to them, because they're disposing of it. >> we're here in another recology studio with abel. what attracted you to apply for this special program? >> who would not want to come to the dump? but is the first question. for me, being in a situation that you're not comfortable in has always been the best. >> what materials were you immediately attracted to when you started and so what was available here? >> there are a lot of books. that is one of the thing that hits me the most. books are good for understanding, language, and art in general. also being a graphic designer, going straight to the magazines and seeing all this printed material being discarded has also been part of my work. of course, always wood or any kind of plastic form or anything like that. >> job mr. some of the pieces you have made while you have
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been here. -- taught me through some of the pieces you have made while you have been here. >> the first thing that attracted me to this was the printed surface. it was actually a poster. it was a silk screen watercolor, about 8 feet long. in terms of the flatwork, i work with a lot of cloddish. so being able to cut into it come at into it, removed parts, it is part of the process of negotiating the final form. >> how do you jump from the two dimensional work that you create to the three-dimensional? maybe going back from the 3f to 2d. >> everything is in the process of becoming. things are never said or settled. the sculptures are being made while i am doing the collages, and vice versa. it becomes a part of something else. there's always this figuring